Home Prototype Construction Links Help                   Etches Preparation Loco chassis Tender Chassis Completed model Up

The following additional items are provided in the kit for the locomotive and tender and may be used if the builder requires:

 

Replacement locomotive parts

 

Coupling rods

Brake blocks and hangers

Cylinder drain cock mechanism and operating lever

Buffer beam

Reach rod

Sander operating rods

Cab floor footplate

Lamp irons

Smokebox door handles

LNWR chimney

 

 

7.1       Coupling rods

7.1.1    There are two types of coupling rods suitable for this locomotive, the later type made up of three jointed sections and the earlier ones that are made up of 3 separate rods on each side (the centre rod overlaps the two outer ones). Generally, the 3-part rods lasted up to WW2 to be replaced by jointed ones, however some locomotives were built with the later type. By BR days, the 3-part rods were very scarce. Study your photos of the prototype! The later type is provided with the kit, but the earlier type is available separately from Brassmasters (ref C106)

7.1.2    These instructions refer to the jointed type included in the base kit. Each side is manufactured from six etches and hinged in front of the second crankpin and behind the third crankpin. There are also overlays for the bosses. There are spares for the bosses so don’t worry when there are some left over at the end.

 

7.1.3    Cut two of the centre pair of rods from fret [C1].

7.1.4    Open the crankpin holes using a 1.5mm drill.  When complete drill a hole using the same size drill perpendicular in a scrap piece of wood. Leave the drill in the hole in the wood. Tin the mating surfaces of a pair of coupling rods and place over the drill. This holds one end of the rods accurately ready for soldering. It is critical to align the two halves exactly in order to make one rod, so take some time tweaking.  See photo.

7.1.5    Attach a boss [C2] to the front and back of each boss, again using the drill to ensure alignment.

7.1.6    Place a little flux along the top surface of the rod and apply heat; the solder on the soldering iron will run down between the rods and join them.  The secret is to apply only a little solder at a time. Solder will fill the “cusp” and give the impression of a solid rod.  See photo. Repeat for the whole length of the rod.

7.1.7    Repeat for the second pair of centre rods [C1].

7.1.8    Next take a pair of outer rods [C3 and C4] and open out the crankpin holes with a 1.5mm drill. Again, assemble using the drill to align the rods.

7.1.9    Take two of the boss overlays [C5] and attach to the front and rear of the rods holding it in place with a cocktail stick and solder in place using the same technique as for joining the rods. The rod below has the overlays added on the right end only and has been dressed with the file as below in section 7.1.11. Finally take two of the forked joint overlays [C6] and attach either side of the forked ends.

7.1.10  Repeat for the other three outer rods.

7.1.11  Clean up each rod with files. Carefully blend the bosses into the front face of the rods. The prototype radius of the blend at the crankpin bosses is 6” so it is best to use a file of about 4mm diameter. I used and oval file. Referring to the middle rod in the attached photo, the file should be placed in middle step and then filed downwards to give the result in the top rod.

7.1.12  The rods for each side of the loco have two knuckle joints to manufacture. They are joined with a small rivet pushed through from the front after carefully opening the holes out to accept the rivet with a reamer. It is vitally important not to let these holes ‘drift’ or this will result in rods that do not match the wheelbase of the chassis.  See photo.

7.1.13  Using a larger drill, lightly countersink the rear face of the forked end.

7.1.14  To stop solder flooding the joint apply a little oil to the surfaces not to be soldered - this will prevent the solder running into the joint. Keep the rear of the rod clean.  Solder can then be quickly applied with a very hot iron to the back of the rod to fix the rivet in place.  Clean off excess solder leaving enough to keep a strong joint. See photo above of completed rods.

7.1.15  If you have eight spare 1/8” diameter axleboxes (available from Brassmasters) it is a good idea to check that the length of the rods matches the wheelbase of the chassis by using axle jigs (the type with reduced diameter ends – put these through the axleboxes and through the coupling rods, all should align perfectly.

7.1.16  A comparison of the Bachmann and Brassmasters rods is shown in the photo.

7.1.17  Open up the crankpin holes in order that the crankpin bushes will rotate freely in the rods. This can be done with a reamer, broach or a fine Swiss file.

7.1.18  Fit the rods to the wheels with washers behind the rods on the outer axles and test run.

7.2       Brakes and brake hangers

7.2.1    The plastic brakes are rather nicely moulded. However metal replacement brake hangers can be fitted if the Bachmann brake hangers are lost or a metal replacement is preferred. Remember plastic does not produce an electrical short and the wheels are sprung so move vertically!

7.2.2    Take the two brake hangers [L26 and L27] and open out the top and hole to clear 0.5mm wire, the centre hole to clear 0.9mm wire and the bottom hole to clear the ends of the brake pull rods [L12, L19 or L20]. Then take the brake block [L28] and open out the hole to clear 0.9mm wire.

7.2.3    Drill two holes vertically in a piece of wood through the top and bottom holes in one of the brake hangers, using an a 0.5mm drill and an appropriate size drill for the bottom hole. Put two pieces of appropriately sized wires in the two holes then place one of the brake hangers over the wires with the half-etched brake block uppermost. With a piece of 0.9mm wire through the centre hole, mount a brake block [L28], followed by the opposite hand brake hanger with the half-etched brake block downwards. Make sure the brake block is the same way round as the half-etched version on the brake hangers, and then solder the three pieces together. Ensure that the top and bottom wires are not soldered to anything. Remove the assembly and cut and file the 0.9mm wire so that a small amount protrudes on one side to represent the bolt holding the brake block. Make another three brake blocks the same, and then another four with the 0.9mm protruding from the opposite side.

7.2.4    Solder four pieces of 0.5mm wire across the mainframes using the holes provided protruding and equal amount beyond the wheels (about 7mm proud of the frames) on both sides, making sure there is a good solder joint inside both sides of the frames. DO NOT CUT OFF THE WIRE BETWEEN THE FRAMES at this stage.

7.2.5    Mount a brake hanger bracket [L29] over each one of the wires and attach to the frames with the top edge horizontal.

7.2.6    Cut eight short pieces of 1.0mm diameter tube about 0.5mm long. This is best done using a craft knife such as a Stanley knife and rolling the tube back and fore with the blade until it cuts into the tube. Be careful as the piece may go flying off. Clean up the tube and also the ends of the 0.5mm wire through the frames and make sure the tube goes over the ends of the wire.

7.2.7    With a wheelset in place, put a piece of tube over the wires adjacent wire and position the brake block assembly in the appropriate place across the tread of the wheel. Slide the piece of tube up to the brake hanger and measure how far the outside edge of the tube is from the frames. Remove the wheelset and the brake hanger assembly and then solder a piece of tube to each wire the measured distance from the frame.

7.2.8    Cut back and file the outer ends of the wire so that they protrude through the brake hanger assembly by about 0.5mm.

7.2.9    It is now time to cut the wire between the frames but DO NOT USE CUTTERS to make the first cut as it will distort the frames; either use a piercing saw or a triangular file. Once the wire is cut, then cutters can be used to trim back the wire inside the frames so that the frames can be remounted on the Bachmann chassis block.

7.2.10  Assemble the brake pull rods as per paragraphs 5.30.1 and 5.30.2 for single brake pull rods, or as per paragraphs 5.31.1, 51.2, 5.31.5 and 5.31.6 for the two sets of pull rods. Do not build the brake shafts at this time.

7.2.11  With the frames mounted on the chassis block, mount the wheels without the suspension springs and retain in place with the keep plate.

7.2.12  If the locomotive you are modelling has only one set of brake pull rods, mount two brake block assemblies on the rear most wire and two on the fore most wire. If the loco has two sets of brake pull rods, mount the brake block assemblies on the rear most and next wires. Position the brake pull rods through the holes in the brake hangers ([L12] for the single pull rod, [L19] for the rear pull rod).

7.2.13  With the locomotive standing on its wheels, manoeuvre the one of the brake block assemblies so that it is vertical and is far enough away from the tread for the wheel and brake block not to come into contact when the wheel moves up and down. Solder the brake block assembly to the pull rod. Repeat for the other three brake block assemblies.

7.2.14  Remove the pull rod/brake block assembly by springing the top of each brake block assembly over the end of the wire. If you have used an active flux, remove the wheels and clean thoroughly to remove any flux.

7.2.15  If the locomotive has two sets of pull rods, repeat 7.2.12 – 7.2.14, but with the brake block assemblies mounted on the foremost and second wires and using the front brake pull rods [L20].

7.2.16  If the locomotive has only one pull rod, mount the remaining brake block assemblies on the wires and solder them to the pull rods.

7.2.17  The brake shaft(s) can now be assembled as per rest of section 5.30 for the single pull rods and as per the rest of section 5.31 for the two brake pull rods.

7.2.18  Removal of the complete assembly is now carried out by springing the brake blocks assemblies off their wires and then springing the brackets to release the brake shafts.

7.3       Cylinder drain cock mechanism and operating lever

7.3.1    Remove the frames from the chassis and the wheels from the frames and then open out the holes in the two cylinder drain cock brackets on the front lower edge of the frames to clear 0.4mm wire.

7.3.2    Take the drain cock operation rod [D5], open out the hole to clear 0.4mm wire and bend the end of the rod through 180 degrees with the bend line on the outside.

7.3.3    Thread a piece of 0.4mm wire through the right hand side bracket in the frame, through the hole in the end of the drain cock operating rod, making sure it is correctly orientated, and then through the hole in the opposite frame.

7.3.4    Position the operating rod so that it is close to the right hand frame. With the vertical part of the operating rod parallel with the axlebox, hold in position and solder to the frames (We used a miniature wood clothes peg from the really useful set sold by Eileen’s Emporium for less than £1).

7.3.5    Position the other end of the rod slightly way from the bracket and solder to the wire and then solder the wire in the bracket. Solder the wire to the bracket at the other end as well.

7.3.6    Cut the wire between the rod on one side and the bracket on the other, BUT DO NOT USE CUTTERS TO MAKE THE FIRST CUT because it will distort the frames; use either a piercing saw or a triangular file. Then you can use cutters to make the second cut.

7.3.7    Cut back the wire on the outside of the brackets and file flush with the front.

7.3.8    Reassemble the frames on the chassis block.

7.3.9    Take the cylinder drain cock operating mechanism etch [S4], place it on the chassis block and file a semi-circular clearance hole centrally for the chassis screw and then bend up each side (see photo). Be careful when handling this etch – hold at the ends otherwise the rods distort – guess how we know!

7.3.10  Cut a piece of 0.6mm wire 14mm long and solder across the etch in the slot provided, with an equal amount protruding each side. Position the assembled etch on the underside of the chassis block and cut back the wires until it fits in position and the wire clears the bracket on the frames at one end and the operating lever at the other. 

7.3.11  Place in the appropriate place on the chassis and note the access hole for the fixing screw is partially obscured – with a semi-circular needle file an access notch. Attach the etch to the chassis block with the extension piece towards the front using cyanoacrylate glue or epoxy resin.

7.4       Buffer beams

7.4.1    The locomotives were fitted with two types of buffer beam, the original [D7] and the strengthened [D8] fitted to some locomotives from mid-1942.

7.4.2    Take the locomotive body and remove the Bachmann buffers by gripping with a pair of pliers and wriggling then until they come loose.

7.4.3    Remove the detail from the cast Bachman buffer beam with a file (We actually use a burr in a mini-drill for removing the buffer bases). Now is the ideal time to solder replacement coupling hook to the etched replacement buffer beam – we use a Brassmasters one! (ref MC005)

7.4.4    If refitting the Bachmann buffers, after pushing through the rivets, attach the buffer bases [D9] to the buffer beam by by solder or using cyanoacrylate glue or epoxy resin.

7.4.5    Attach the buffer beam to the loco using cyanoacrylate glue or epoxy resin.

7.4.6    Replace the Bachmann buffers or fit replacement buffers. Undoubtedly you will have damaged the Bachmann red paint so it is probably best to remove this from all the buffer body before refitting.

 

7.5       Reach rod

7.5.1    The prototype locos were fitted with two versions of Joy valve gear, the original indirect drive, and the later direct drive, each type having a different reach rod and weighbar lever. The direct drive can be identified as the reach rod is straight, on indirect drive it is cranked (the bend is behind the second splasher sand box). By the 1930s indirect drive was far more common. If you need to study photographs, 9204 on p117 of LNWR Eight coupled locomotives is direct drive, 9061 p107 is indirect. As well as providing for the different reach rods and weighbar levers, the kit also provides for the valve gear to be in the mid position or the full forward position.

7.5.2    Remove the boiler and cab from the footplate by undoing the screws underneath the footplate under smoke box and under the firebox backplate. The backplate can then be removed and the boiler/cab assembly can be lifted off. Remove the cab handrail for safe keeping.

7.5.3    Remove the reach rod by cutting behind the sandbox and cutting between the rod and the bracket on the third splasher. Do not damage the bracket as it is used with the new reach rods.

7.5.4    The sandbox on the second splasher is too wide to allow the reach rod to pass down the back. Reduce the width of the sandbox from the back by 0.5mm (the prototype did this too).

Earlier indirect valve gear

7.5.5    In this version of the valve gear, the weighbar was mounted low down in the frames. Firstly chose whether the valve gear is to be in mid position or full forward.

7.5.6    Select the appropriate weighbar lever front and back (for mid gear [D10] lever front, [D11] lever back, for forward gear, [D12] lever front, [D13] lever back).

7.5.7    Open out the two upper holes to clear 6mm wire then carefully bend the lever front and lever back as shown in the diagram (there is a half-etched dimple where the outer rod needs to be bent at the bottom). A piece of 6mm wire passed through the holes needs to be parallel to the footplate. When satisfied solder together.

7.5.8    Take the indirect each rod [D14], open out the hole to clear 6mm wire and push through the rivets for the joint from the back. Attach the joint plate [D15] to the back of the rod behind the rivets.

7.5.9    The weighbar lever is attached to the footplate in the position shown in the diagram, using cyanoacrylate glue or epoxy resin. However, if you are going to fit replacement sander levers (see section 7.6) it is best to attach the reach rod and weighbar after these.

7.5.10  Trim back the reach rod at the cab end so that it clears the cab front when in position. Using the washers [D16] between the reach rod and the back of the weighbar lever, Make sure the rod will sit in the correct position out from the boiler, thinning the back of the bracket on the splasher if necessary.

7.5.11  Place the reach rod in position and insert a short length of 6mm wire through the joint with the weighbar lever. Secure the reach rod in position behind the bracket on the third splasher using cyanoacrylate glue or epoxy resin.

7.5.12  Solder or glue the joint wire in position and trim to length.

7.5.13  If not fitting the replacement sander operating rods, re-assemble the boiler, cab and footplate.

Later direct valve gear

7.5.14  In this version of the valve gear the weighbar was mounted level with the top of the frames. First chose whether the valve gear is to be in mid position or full forward.

7.5.15  Take the bearing base [D17] and carefully bend at right angle along the back of the full etched piece (see photo of an indirect reach bar). Attach a spacer [D18] to the bottom.

7.5.16  Select the appropriate weighbar lever front and back (for mid gear, [D19] lever front, [D20] lever back, for forward gear, [D21] lever front, [D22] lever back).

7.5.17  Open out the two upper holes to clear 6mm wire then carefully bend the lever front and lever back as shown in the diagram. A piece of 6mm wire passed through the holes needs to be parallel to the footplate.

When satisfied, solder together.

7.5.18  Solder the weighbar levers to the back pf the bearing base (see photo).

7.5.19  Take a piece of 2.0mm wire and file the end 4mm into a ‘D’- shape, such that the ‘D’ is slightly less than half the original diameter (0.8mm). Cut two lengths 1.5mm long.

7.5.20  Attach one length to the top of the bearing base (see photo).

7.5.21  Make the bearing for the opposite end of the weighbar by taking two spacers [D18] and soldering them together. Attach the second piece of the D shaped wire to the top (see photo).

7.5.22  Take the direct reach rod [D23] and open out the hole to clear 6mm wire and push through the rivets for the joint from the back. Attach the joint plate [D15] to the back of the rod behind the rivets.

7.5.23  Make two bends at right angles in the reach rod at the half-etched bend lines. Apply a generous fillet of solder to the inside of both bends to represent the shape of the rod at this point.

7.5.24  The weighbar lever and opposite bearing are attached to the footplate in the positions shown in the diagram, using cyanoacrylate glue or epoxy resin.

7.5.25  Trim back the reach rod at the cab end so that it clears the cab front when in position. Make sure the rod will sit in the correct position out from the boiler, thinning the back of the bracket on the splasher if necessary.

7.5.26  Place the reach rod in position and insert a short length of 6mm wire through the joint with the weighbar lever. Secure the reach rod in position behind the bracket on the third splasher using cyanoacrylate glue or epoxy resin. However, if you are going to fit replacement sander levers (see section 7.6), it is best to attach the reach rod and weighbar after these.

7.5.27  Solder or glue the joint wire in position and trim to length.

7.5.28  If not fitting the replacement sander operating rods, re-assemble the boiler, cab and footplate.

7.6       Sander operating rods

7.6.1    If not already done so, remove the boiler/cab assembly as in 7.5.2. This is what you are aiming for.

7.6.2    Carefully cut off the plastic sander operating mechanism below the lever and behind the bracket on the splasher (see photo). File the top of the mechanism flat – you will need to leave about 1.35mm of the upstand present. If you leave too much, the mechanisms foul the boiler cladding. Strangely, the right hand side of the Bachmann boiler seems closer to the sandboxes than the left – be aware of this when you are making these mechanisms and try a ‘dry run’ of fitting the boiler before securing these mechanisms. Also, it will be necessary to carve the back of the bracket on the splasher until it is slightly thinner.

7.6.3    Drill a 0.35mm hole vertically in the centre of each sander valve (see photo)

7.6.4    Drill a 0.35mm hole horizontally through the sander bracket on the splasher (see photo).

7.6.5    Take four sander levers [D30] and ensure the holes clear 0.33mm wire,

7.6.6    Drill a 0.33mm hole vertically in a piece of wood, insert a short length of 0.33 wire in the hole, place a sander lever over the wire and solder in place. Trim the wire on one side of the lever almost flush.

7.6.7    Repeat for the other three levers.

7.6.8    Take the two sander operating rods ([D31} left hand side and D32] right hand side) and make sure the holes in the bottom clear 0.33 wire.

7.6.9    Using the same piece of wood, insert a short length of 0.33 wire in the hole, place a sander operating rod over the wire and solder in place. Trim the wire on the inside of the rod almost flush.

7.6.10  Repeat for the other sander operating rod.

7.6.11  Place two of the sander levers in the left hand sandboxes and inset the left hand operating rod [D31] into the back of the bracket on the footplate.

7.6.12  Carefully adjust the position of the levers and rod so that the rods are horizontal and the two levers are in the correct position. Secure in place using cyanoacrylate glue or if you are brave a tiny dab of solder between the lever and the rod.

7.6.13  Repeat for the right hand sander rod and levers.

7.6.14  Replace the boiler and cab assembly on the footplate by reversing the sequence in 7.5.2.

7.7       Cab footplate floor

7.7.1    Check that the cab footplate floor [D33] fits in position before attaching using cyanoacrylate glue or epoxy resin.

 

7.8       Lamp irons

7.8.1    The lamp irons provided on the loco are plastic and are therefore too thick. Etched replacements are provided for the footplate ones and the one on the top front of the smokebox.

7.8.2    Remove the plastic lamp irons on the Bachmann footplate by carving them off and fill any resultant holes with filler.

7.8.3    Take three footplate lamp irons [D34] and bend them at right angles where the upright joins the base. Glue in position on the footplate using cyanoacrylate glue or epoxy resin. The centre one should be offset to the right (looking at the loco front) by just over 0.5mm (0.67mm) and the same distance back from the front edge of the footplate. The other two are in line with the buffers and again just over 0.5mm (0.67mm) from the footplate edge. Remember, the vertical part of the bracket is furthest away from the buffer beam with the section with two bolts to the front.

7.8.4    If you are going to fit a replacement whitemetal LNWR chimney, jump to section 7.10 as it is safer to do that now. The top lamp iron is quite respectable especially if carefully thinned with a file. To fit the replacement brass smoke box top lamp iron [D35] requires the handrails to be removed and this means that the three handrail knobs on the front of the smokebox have to be pulled out. This can be done quite easily be putting the points of a pair of tweezers either side of the handrail knob from the outside of the smokebox and levering very gently on the smokebox door (We put a piece of cardboard over the door to lever on so as not to mark the door). Remove the handrail by pulling it out of the knobs down the left hand side of the locomotive and out of the hole on the right hand side of the locomotive.

7.8.5    Carefully remove two knobs from the short end of the wire. Put one carefully away, but the other will need to be mounted in a pin chuck with the base outwards. This is best done by mounting the hand rail on a short piece of wire, putting the wire into the chuck between the jaws and then tightening the chuck on the knob.

7.8.6    Using the wire to orientate the knob, file flats on each side of the knob spigot at right angles to the wire until the slot on the lamp iron [D35] slides over the spigot. File a similar flat on what will be the top side of the spigot to ensure the lamp iron sits down on the knob far enough. Finally, reduce the thickness of the knob base by filing around the spigot.

7.8.7    Cut off the top plastic lamp iron and file the top of the smokebox smooth. Be careful not to damage the rivets on the smokebox. Carefully carve off the representation of the lamp iron base on the smokebox front. Don’t forget that the smokebox door opens. Clean up any over-enthusiastic application of glue by Bachmann round the other holes.

7.8.8    Remount the removed handrail knobs on the wire, the centre one first and in the correct orientation. Refit the wire handrail to the loco, being careful that the knobs do not fall off the end of the wire as you do so (We thought we had lost one of ours!). Push the knobs into place into their original holes.

7.8.9    Pull each of the outer two knobs out in turn, carefully apply a small spot of glue to the spigot and push back in. Apply a small spot of glue to the rear of the top lamp iron, pull the centre knob out slightly, position the lamp iron and push the knob into place. We used cyanoacrylate for this, but epoxy resin would also work.

Smokebox door handles

7.9       Some Bachmann models come with twin smokebox door darts (a wartime fitting and far from universal) and the plastic wheel is quite heavily moulded anyway.

To replace this, take the smokebox door wheel [D61] and clean up the center hole with a reamer to accept 0.3mm wire. Solder this on place and after removing the plastic top dart lever, drill a hole and glue in place.

 

LNWR Chimney

7.10     All the Bachmann models come with Stanier Chimneys which were not fitted until the late 1930s and did not become common until the 1950s. A replacement cast whitemetal LNWR Chimney is available from Brassmasters (ref A251).

Cut off the plastic chimney with cutters finishing off with files and fine emery paper. It is essential that a smooth smokebox top is formed.

Clean up the whitemetal chimney and shorten the base stub which fouls on the Bachmann weight inside the smokebox. Drill out the top to a deeper level as this improves appearances and fit with glue.

8          Additional tender components

 

The following additional items are provided in the kit for the locomotive and tender and may be used if the builder requires:

 

Brake gear

Vacuum reservoir

Coal compartment doors

Fire iron rails

Lamp irons

Handbrake and water scoop handwheels

Guard irons

Tender cab steps

 

8.1       Brake gear

The Bachmann tender brake gear is moulded as part of the frames and is perhaps the weakest visual area of the model.

The replacement brake gear can be fitted to the EasiChas frames for EM and P4, and for 00 it can be fitted to the brake frame [D36] which also represents the tender tank (not used for EM or P4).

8.1.1    Cut the brake gear away and clean up the cuts, especially the inside of the ‘round ended’ cut-outs.

8.1.2    For a 00 model, fold up the sides of the brake frame [D36] to 90 degrees. With the tender wheels removed, check in position.

For both 00 and EM/P4, the remaining instructions are the same.

8.1.3    Bend up the front brake shaft bracket [D37] and solder in position across the top of the EasiChas frames with the center tongue engaging in the frame cut-out. These brackets should be immediately behind the tender frames, the plastic frames are further apart than prototypical so if you are not fitting replacement Brassmasters frames but retaining the plastic Bachmann ones then adjust the bends (there is a second half-etched line above the ‘V’) so they are in this position.

8.1.4    Solder the brake shaft bracket overlays [D38] in position on the outside of the rear brake shaft brackets on the EasiChas frames with the bolt heads in a square configuration (like :: ) bolts parallel to the track.

8.1.5    Identify the handbrake lever [D39], the handbrake pull rods [D40] and the vacuum brake lever [D41]] and open out the holes in the end to clear 0.6mm wire. Also ensure the holes in the two brake shaft brackets will also clear 0.6mm wire.

8.1.6    Cut two pieces of 0.6mm wire long enough to go across the two brake shaft brackets and be flush on the outside.

8.1.7    For the rear brake shaft cut 3 pieces of 1.2mm x 0.6mm inside diameter tube, 1.8mm, 6.8mm and 2.2mm long.

8.1.8    Place a piece of 0.6mm wire through the rear brake shaft bracket and position the handbrake lever [D39] over the wire and then push the wire through the opposite bracket. Hold the handbrake lever against the inside of the right hand frame (left hand when looking from below) and with the end against the base of the EasiChas, solder in position at the base end. DO NOT SOLDER TO THE WIRE.

8.1.9    Pull the wire back so that it just goes through the bracket and handbrake lever and then assemble the rear brake shaft by first mounting the 1.8mm piece of tube on the wire, then one of the handbrake pull rods [D40] (the end with the slot is towards the front - see photo to get the correct orientation), then the 6.8mm piece of tube, then the second joining rod and then 2.2mm piece of tube. Finally push the wire through the opposite side bracket. Check that the tube does not cause the brackets to splay out sideways.

8.1.10  For the front brake shaft cut, four pieces of 1.2mm x 0.6mm inside diameter brass tube 7.5mm (8.0mm if fitting to the plastic frames of the Bachmann tender), 5.6mm, 0.8mm and 7.5mm long (8.0mm if fitting to the plastic frames of the Bachmann tender).

 

8.1.11  Now assemble the front brake shaft by putting the wire through the left hand side bracket (again the right when looking from underneath) and then mount the 7.5mm piece of tube, then the free end of the first joining rod, then the 5.6mm piece of tube, then the vacuum brake lever [D41] with the piston rod towards the front, then 0.8mm piece of tube, then the free end of the second joining rod, then the 7.5mm piece of tube. Finally push the wire through the opposite side bracket. Check that the tube does not cause the brackets to splay out sideways. The assembly should then look like this (see photo, although the rear wire here has not been cut flush).

8.1.12  Push the wire on the rear brake shaft slightly out through the bracket and apply a small drop of oil, then push it slightly out of the opposite side and apply a further drop of oil. Now with the brake shaft wire flush at both ends, carefully apply solder or glue to the rear shaft (the oil will prevent the wire and tube being soldered to the bracket).

8.1.13  Repeat for the front brake shaft, ensuring the brake cylinder spindle is vertical.

8.1.14  Remove the handbrake linkage assembly by springing the brackets apart. 

8.1.15  The prototype tender brakes and their actuation linkages are a horribly complicated assembly with four pull rods situated both sides of each wheel. Study the drawing. This kit follows this faithfully and will test your modelling skills. Open out the holes in all the brake pull rods [D42] and [D43] to clear 0.5mm wire. Note that the one on the bottom of the etch has no centre hole (left hand end) – keep this separate as it needs to be the inside pull rod.

8.1.16  Prepare the brake hangers and blocks ([D44] left hand front, [D45] right hand front, [D46] left hand, [D47] right hand) by pushing through the half-etched rivet in the middle of the brake block from the rear. Then open out the holes in the top and bottom of the brackets to clear 0.5mm wire and the hole near the bottom to clear 0.6mm wire.

8.1.17  Open out the hole in the link that protrudes at the rear of the front brake hanger and blocks ([D44] and [D45] to clear 0.5mm wire.

8.1.18  Remove the appropriate assembly jig for the etch frame (21mm for P4 and 20mm for EM are on the EasiChas etch frame, the 18mm for 00 is on the detailing etch frame). Open out the holes to clear 0.5mm wire and bend the jig into a ‘U’- shape. 

8.1.19  Push two 25mm lengths of 0.5mm wire through the two holes.

 

8.1.20  Place the upper hole of a left brake hanger [D46] over the lower 0.5mm wire on one side of the jig and rest it against the hanger against the upper wire. Repeat with a right brake hanger [D47] on the opposite side. Inset a piece of 0.6mm wire through the lower of the two exposed holes in the brake hanger and solder each end in place. We use blue tack to hold the wire in place and mini clothes pegs to hold the brake hangers in place during soldering (removed for the picture as they obscured the jig).

8.1.21  Push a 30-40mm piece of 0.5mm wire through the upper exposed hole in one brake hanger, then through the single hole of two brake pull rods ([D40] and [D41]) with the detail side face to face. Ensure that the rods are correctly orientated. Finally push the wire through the opposite brake hanger. Make sure that an equal amount is showing either side of the brake hangers and solder into place to the brake hanger only (not the pull rod at this stage).

8.1.22  Remove the lower wire from the jig and remove the assembly.

8.1.23  Place the second pair of brake hangers in the jig and again solder a piece of 0.6mm wires between the lower of the exposed holes.

8.1.24  Repeat 8.1.21, this time putting the wire through the appropriate holes in the centre of the pull rods, again ensuring correct orientation (see photo below and diagram).

8.1.25  Finally mount the two leading brake hangers [D44] and [D45] in the jig and solder a piece of 0.6mm wire between the lower of the exposed hole.

8.1.26  Repeat 8.1.21, this time putting the wire through the appropriate holes in the front of the rods, again ensuring correct orientation (see photo/diagram).

8.1.27  With the wheels and handbrake linkage assembly removed, place three pieces of 0.5mm wire 26mm long through the holes in the EasiChas frame and solder into place in both frames, making sure an equal length protrudes from both side of the frames.

8.1.28  Take six pieces of 1.0mm x 0.5mm diameter tube about 1.0mm long and solder one piece on each end of the wire with the outside edge the same distance apart as the jig size used in paragraph 8.1.8.

8.1.29  Replace the wheels and then assemble the brake gear by mounting the brake hanger assemblies over the ends of the support wires.

8.1.30  Mount the remaining brake pull rods ([D42] and [D43]), with the detail side outermost, over the ends of the 0.5mm wire, and position the correct distance out from the face of the wheels to ensure that the wheels do not touch the rods when the wheels are at their fullest amount of side play, but also still narrower than the tender side frames.

8.1.31  Pull the brake gear off the wheels to ensure that the brake blocks do not touch the wheels and solder the brake pull rod to the 0.5mm wire. Check the position of all brake hangers and solder all the remaining brake hangers to the pull rods.

8.1.32  Position the pull rods that are loose on the 0.5mm wires between the brake hangers so they do not touch the rods when the wheels are at their fullest amount of side play and solder in place on the 0.5mm wire.

Note the vertical brake activation lever is on the incorrect side in this photograph– see correct picture in 8.1.11.

8.1.33  Remove the brake gear by springing the top of the hangers off the support wires. If you have used an active flux, remove the wheels and clean thoroughly to remove any flux.

8.1.34  The brake gear now needs to be finished off. Mount short lengths of 0.5mm wire through the remaining holes in the brake pull rods and solder in position. Please note that there is no hole in the link at the bottom of the front brake hangers but a short piece of wire still needs soldering through the outer hole.

8.1.35  Trim the outer ends of the 0.6mm cross wire so it is flush with the face of the brake hanger and trim all the ends of the short wires to represent bolt heads.

8.1.36  The 0.5mm cross wire now needs to be cut between the inner brake hangers frames but DO NOT USE CUTTERS TO MAKE THE FIRST CUT because it will distort the brake gear. Make the first cut with a saw or triangular file, then cutters can be used to trim the wire back the brake hanger.

8.1.37  The complete brake gear, including the handbrake linkage assembly can now be mounted on the frames.

8.2       Vacuum reservoir

8.2.1    If you have not already done so, bend down the four tabs in the base of the EasiChas frames to 90 degrees.

8.2.2    Cut the 8.0mm tube to 10.2mm long.

8.2.3    Form the tender straps [D48] into a circular shape around a suitable round object (pin vice?) and solder at 0.7mm and 1.7mm from one end of the tube (the leading end).

8.2.4    Glue or solder the tube to the supports, with the leading end towards the front, so that the front edge of the tube is 12.0mm in front of the centre axle. The completed chassis mounted in replacement BC3 frames is shown here.

8.3       Coal compartment doors

8.3.1    Take the coal space doors [D51] and, with a square or triangular file, cut a groove through the centre of the door on the half-etched side, using the gap in the beading top and bottom as a guide, so as to form a bend line. Bend the door with groove innermost to a gentle 'V' angle that measures 11mm from outer edge to outer edge.

8.3.2    Solder the door centre [D52] in the groove formed with the file in the centre of the door with the angle edge at the top edge against the doors (i.e. not flat against the doors).

8.3.3    Remove the two plastic handles (Water scoop and Brake) and their support box to save from damage, hold the box behind the wheel with a pair of pliers and pull. If you are lucky, the spigot will pull out the tender front; if not, it will break off. Store them carefully.

Carefully make two saw cuts down the front of the coal space about 10mm apart and equidistant about the door centreline and about 9mm down from the top edge. Join the bottom edge of the two saw cuts by sawing across.

8.3.4    Make a series of holes with a drill in the coal space floor just behind the front wall between the saw cuts. Open up between the saw cuts so that piece falls out.

8.3.5    With files, carefully widen the opening to 11mm wide and down to the bottom edge of the moulded line.

8.3.6    The door can now be glued in place using cyanoacrylate glue or epoxy resin.

8.4       Fire iron rails

8.4.1    The part of the fire iron rails along the top of the tender fender is missing. Also, the fire iron rails that are there on the Bachmann tender are a plastic moulding and over thick and over tall. Provided in the kit are a straight etch for the uprights along the tender edge and a replacement etch for the main curved rails. The straight etch can be used with the plastic original curved rails or with the replacement curved rails.

8.4.2    The uprights on the prototype were ‘T’-shaped steel and need fabricating, take the straight fire iron rails [D49] and solder 0.3mm wire into the grooves in the front of the uprights on the same side as the full etch base. Make sure the wire is no longer than the grooves. You will see just beyond the end of the groove a small etched dot. Don’t confuse this with the end of the groove as the dot indicates a bend point, so the wire must stop short of the dot.

8.4.3    Turn the etch over and fill the groove in the back of the upright with solder.

 

8.4.4    With the fully etched strip towards you, bend the uprights on the straight fire iron rails where they meet the fully etched part away from you until they are at right angles, then bend them back again at the bottom of the wire to form an ‘S’- bend (see photo). Check that they sit over the top edge of the tender fender.

8.4.5    If you are fitting these uprights with plastic curved rails a corner needs to be filed off the lower edge of the end of the curved part of the plastic rails so that it fits over the etched foot. This is not easy and requires the plastic part to be forced over the edge of the tender and held with pliers whilst filing. Fortunately, the plastic is so pliable it will take this abuse. (Unfortunately, there is no picture of this as we didn’t have enough hands to work the camera as well!)

8.4.6    Attach the uprights etch to the top inside of the tender using cyanoacrylate glue or epoxy resin.

8.4.7    Take the curved fire iron rails [D50} and solder 0.3mm wire into the grooves on the back of the uprights. You will see just beyond the end of the groove a small etched dot. Don’t confuse this with the end of the groove as the dot indicates a bend point, so the wire must stop short of the dot.

8.4.8    With the wire side towards you, bend the curved rails along the row of dots at the bottom of the uprights towards you until the resulting angle is less than 90 degrees (see photo). Ensure that the rails sit vertically. Adjust the bend if they do not.

8.4.9    Again, with the wire side towards you, bend the end of the curved rails around a 2mm drill through 90 degrees towards you (see photo).

 

8.4.10  Carefully cut the base of the uprights of the plastic curved rails and discard the rails, carve any remnants flat and then carve off the rivets on the tender top where the base of the etched curved rails will be.

Attach the curved rails to the tender top using cyanoacrylate glue or epoxy resin.

Note that the curved rail joins the edge of the last upright on the straight rails on the side nearest the next upright (see photo).

 

8.5       Tender lamp irons

8.5.1    The lamp irons provided on the tender are plastic and over thick, and there is no lamp iron provided on the top rear of the tender. Etched replacements are provided for the footplate ones and also for the top one.

8.5.2    Remove the plastic lamp irons on the Bachmann tender by carving them off.

8.5.3    Take three footplate lamp irons [D34] and bend them at right angles where the upright joins the base. Glue in position on the footplate using cyanoacrylate glue or epoxy resin. The centre one should be offset to the right (looking at the tender rear) by just over 2mm (2.17mm) and flush with the rear edge of the footplate. The other two are in line with the buffers and just under 1mm (0.92mm) from the footplate edge. Remember, the vertical part of the lamp iron is nearest to the edge of the footplate.

8.5.4    Take a fender lamp iron [D55] and the fender spacer [D56] and solder the spacer to the back of the lamp iron. Attach the lamp iron to the centre of the tender fender below the lip (see photo)

8.6       Handbrake and water scoop handwheels

8.6.1    The original drawings of the Bowen Cooke tenders show larger handwheels fitted. The only known photo of the front of a tender in service is shown in the book ‘The North Western at Work’ and shows large wheels with turned knobs. 

8.6.2    If you have not already removed them wefound it easier to replace the handwheel if the complete wheel and box assembly are removed. Hold the box behind the wheel with a pair of pliers and pull. If you are lucky, the spigot will pull out the tender front, if not it will break off.

8.6.3    Remove the original Bachmann plastic handwheel by cutting immediately behind it.

8.6.4    Drill down through the centre of the plastic boss on the box with a 0.6mm drill.

8.6.5    Drill out the hole in the back of the rim of the handwheel [D57] to clear 0.4mm wire.

8.6.6    Use a file to remove the cusp around the outside of the wheel and then round off the outer edge, then solder a 1.75mm length of 0.4mm wire to form the handle.

8.6.7    Mount a length of 0.6mm wire in the box using cyanoacrylate glue or epoxy resin and cut back so about 0.6mm is left protruding.

8.6.8    Attach the handwheel to the spindle using cyanoacrylate glue or epoxy resin.

8.6.9    Re-attach the assembly to the tender front using cyanoacrylate glue or epoxy resin.

8.7       Guard irons

8.7.1    Take the left hand guard iron ([D53] and, holding the base part in a hand vice or pliers, bend over to a right angle (making sure you are bending it away from the side with the half-etched rivet holes) (see photo). 

Then bend the lower part into an ‘S’-bend leaving 1.5mm at the tip of the guard iron straight (for the second bend, we used round nose pliers).

8.7.2    Repeat for the right hand guard iron [D54].

8.7.3    Push through the rivets from the rear and fix in position on the inside of the Bachmann tender frames using cyanoacrylate glue or epoxy resin.

8.8       Tender cab steps

8.8.1    The steps fitted to the Bachman tenders with tender cabs are plastic and are therefore too thick.

8.8.2    Remove the Bachmann originals if fitted.

8.8.3    Take the left rear footstep [D58] and heavily scribe a line across the as shown in the photo. Then, with a square file, file a groove across the etch as shown in the photo.

8.8.4    Similarly, take an upper footstep [D59], scribe a line then file a groove 6mm in from the edge (see photo). Fold the footstep along the groove line.

8.8.5    Fold up the sides if the footstep along the half-etched line and then fold up the back of the footstep along the groove.

8.8.6    Solder the upper footstep between the footstep supports.

8.8.7    Bend the leg of the footsteps support with the two etched rivets into a slight ‘S’-shape making sure that both supports are now the same length (see photo).

8.8.8    If fitting to the Bachmann frames, bend over the tops of the supports either side level with the rearward facing tab and towards the front of the locomotive.

   

 

8.8.9    Again, if fitting to the Bachmann frames, reduce the length of the rear support by 1.0mm, then bend it back at about 24 degrees and bend the last 0.6mm over so that it lies flat against the frames.

8.8.10  Repeat for the footsteps the other side using the right rear footstep [D60] and another upper footstep [D59].

8.8.11  Attach the steps to the frames, either Bachmann or replacement, using cyanoacrylate glue or epoxy resin.

 

     
   

Page last updated November 2017